Women Are Why We Need A Fashion Revolution

  Image via Fashion Revolution, © Claudio Montesano Castillas

Image via Fashion Revolution, © Claudio Montesano Castillas

On April 24, 2013, the Rana Plaza building in Bangladesh collapsed. The Rana Plaza building was home to five garment factories that produced clothes for major fashion brands. According to Fashion Revolution1,138 people died and another 2,500 were injured, making it the fourth largest industrial disaster in history. 

The victims were mostly young women. 

80 percent of the people making our clothes are women ages 18-24, the same demographic of young women who buy and consume fast fashion. We need a Fashion Revolution because we need to connect the dots and recognize that advocating for a fairer fashion industry, is in actuality, a feminist issue. 

As Remake founder Ayesha Barenblat once said to me in an interview, "[In Western countries], millennial designers are graduating from fashion schools, and simultaneously, on the other side of the world, millennial women are entering the garment industry. I saw a connection in the fact that globally, millennial women are starting their fashion careers from opposite sides of the supply chain."

Fashion Revolution Day is on April 23, 2018. Join the movement next Monday, April 23, by following these three steps: 

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Fashion Revolution Day is a good time to re-think your shopping habits. See my previous blog post here for conscious consumer tips. 

For those in the industry looking to promote a supply chain that empowers women, see my interview with the Head of Gender Justice and Human Rights at the C&A Foundation on the United Nations site here, and see my speech at Madrid Fashion Week about how the fashion industry can participate in Gender Equality here

Learn more about the Fashion Revolution movement here.  

What Does Gender Equality Have To Do With the Fashion Industry? Everything.

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At the end of January, I had the honor of representing Remake as an ambassador at the “Smart Fashion = Slow Fashion” Event during Madrid Fashion Week. Set inside one of Madrid’s most popular concept stores, El Paracaidista, the event gathered fashion changemakers together to discuss how the fashion industry can contribute to the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals.

The event was organized by Mariel Jumpa of Slow Fashion WorldEl Paracaidista owner and The Circular Project Founder, Paloma Garcia, Moda Sostenible de Madrid MSMAD (Sustainable Fashion of Madrid), and Asociación de Creadores de Moda de España ACME (Association of Fashion Designers of Spain).

Throughout the day, changemakers spoke about diverse topics such as alternative materials (banana fibers, etc.) zero waste, and circular fashion models. I spoke about connecting the dots between women’s empowerment and conscious fashion, referencing item #5 on the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals: Gender Equality.

According to the United Nations, item #5 on the SDG’s is committed to eliminating discrimination against women and girls. This goal is a call to end all forms of violence, ensure that women have equal opportunities and participation in the political, economical, and public life, and overall, to adopt policies and practices that promote gender equality in all levels of society.

What does this have to do with the fashion industry? As it turns out, everything. 

Find out more via my blog post on REMAKE here. 

The Social & Cultural Value of Haute Couture

   Couturier Yumi Katsura takes her final bow. Image via Yumi Katsura

 Couturier Yumi Katsura takes her final bow. Image via Yumi Katsura

 It’s easy to dismiss Haute Couture as inaccessible and unapproachable. After all, not many people have the ability to shell out six-figures for a single dress. Most would argue that even if they did have the money, they’d rather use it on something more useful, like a down payment on a house, a college education, or even donations towards a community cause.

While all of these points are valid, I invite you to think about couture in a different way: the eye-widening price tags that come with a couture dress have the ability to pay for an entire team of artisans, which in turn, can feed their families for months at a time. That’s more than what we can say about the price accessible $20 dresses we can get at fast fashion outlets like Zara or H&M, which more likely than not, exploited the worker who made them.

In a past interview, designer Christine Nielsen of Hyun Mi Nielsen once shared with me, “It’s very important to me to produce in Italy and in France because I know that people have a good life: They have a pension, they get paid extra if they work weekends. It’s an ethical way of working. It’s important to know that the people in the production chain are empowered, that I am supporting a system that makes sure workers have a good life,” she said.

While I don't know if the method is the same for bigger couture brands like Chanel, I do know that smaller couturiers have a similar approach as the one stated by Ms. Nielsen above. 

Above: Hyun Mi Nielsen's latest collection is entitled Mensch, a yiddish word that translates to decency & honor. She uses the term to recognize those who have been displaced by mass migration, and who are constantly moving across space and time- thus the movement in the fabrics. While the world may label them as 'homeless' or 'refugee' the designer honors their dignity as people. The materials are upcycled from previous collections and materials, a reflection of the designer's ethos of sustainability. (Click to the right to view more images)

Second, artisans are specialized craftsmen and craftswomen who have trained in a niche skill for years. Many of them are trained in ancient crafts that originate from cultural traditions that are sadly going extinct. As our world moves faster and faster, these traditions are fading away because the slow process of producing them is viewed as ‘cumbersome’ to a new generation who are used to speed.

But these traditions are important to preserve, and so is the respect for the time it takes to make something of quality and substance. For example, can you imagine a world where the kimono becomes a thing of the past? The kimono, an icon of Japanese savoir-faire, has the possibility of fading into obscurity in a few generations.

Haute couture takes these traditional crafts and revives them in modern fashion. By doing so, artisans can continue their work, earn an income, and the craft can stay relevant enough to be passed on to the next generation.

Above: Japanese couturier Yumi Katsura revives the old Japanese technique of dyeing called Yuzen. She merges French and Japanese techniques to re-introduce the kimono in modern fashion. Yumi also created the "Washi-Mode" style dress made with traditional paper fabricated by hand, which is on display at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. Washi is recognized as a cultural heritage creation by UNESCO. (Click to the right to see more images)

Furthermore, the nature of couture is sustainable and slow fashion. Because couture dresses are made-to-order, they are produced in much smaller batches and use less waste. Many couturiers I’ve seen this season have also used upcycling in their collections, turning waste into wearable art.

Above: Yumia Nakazato’s collection is repurposed from disposed industrial products like airbags and parachutes. The designer tells me that what we call “sustainable habits” are natural to the Japanese culture. The traditional Japanese custom of mending ragged textiles (“boro”) is aligned with his technique. (Click to the right to view more images)

While not everyone can buy an haute couture dress, we can all learn from the nature of couture by slowing our fashion down. We can do so by buying less, choosing better, and developing a better relationship with our clothes. If a piece of clothing gets torn, mend it instead of disposing of it. Instead of being tempted to buy cheap items that will likely not get worn often, choose the ones that you know you can commit to wearing at least 30-50 times.

And finally, there are in fact, affordable brands out there that use the same practice of reviving old traditions into modern wear. See my brand directory to learn more, as well as this piece I worked on with Dyanna Quizon on Hella Pinay.

To slowing down,

Ruby

 

 

 

 

 

January 27: I'll Be Speaking at "Smart Fashion = Slow Fashion" Event During Madrid Fashion Week

  Image via  Conscious Latina

Dear Friends, 

It is with excitement that I share the details of my first speaking engagement of the year, which will be held during Madrid Fashion Week. I will be joining fellow fashion changemakers on January 27th at the "Smart Fashion = Slow Fashion" event, a day of presentations centered around helping the industry contribute to the United Nations' Sustainable Development Goals.

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I am proud to present at the conference as an ambassador of Remake, an organization dedicated to mobilizing a conscious consumer movement, based in San Francisco. I will be speaking on the topic: "Fashion & Empowerment: Beyond the Image", where I will connect the dots between the women's empowerment movement and sustainable fashion. 

WHO: The event is organized by The Circular Project , founding partner of the Sustainable Fashion Association of Madrid MSMAD , along with the Association of Fashion Designers of Spain ACME and the international platform Slow Fashion World. Additional guests include the British Fashion Council, Greenpeace, Oxfam, and more. 

WHAT + WHY: Exhibitions of fashion designers creating change, as well as a day of meetings and conferences to inform the fashion industry about ways to contribute to the UN's Sustainable Development Goals. 

WHEN: Taking place during Madrid Fashion Week, fashion exhibitions will be open during January 23-30, and the day of conferences (where I'll be presenting) is on January 27. My presentation is at 1:30 PM. 

WHERE: El Paracaidista , a Concept Store: Calle de La Palma 10, Madrid

To see the full agenda and for details on how to attend, see here. 

Hope to see you in Madrid! 

H&M: This Is Why We Need Storytellers of Color

 Right: The original ad. Left: A re-interpreted version by artist  Chris Classic

Right: The original ad. Left: A re-interpreted version by artist Chris Classic

In a heightened state of political and social consciousness, it is baffling how a mega brand like H&M can somehow make the mistake of printing a wildly offensive ad. The ad, featuring a young black boy wearing a sweatshirt with the worlds “coolest monkey in the jungle”, is obviously racist. Yet somehow, it still managed to get approved into print.

This what happens when there isn’t any diversity or inclusion in the decision making table.

This faux pas cost H&M valuable celebrity partnerships. The Weeknd sent out a tweet that he will no longer work with the brand, followed by social media condemnation by LeBron James and hundreds of thousands of Twitter users threatening to boycott the company.

Not only is this mistake unacceptable, but it could have been so easily avoided.

Companies and organizations need to prioritize diversity in their leadership, and to nurture decision makers and storytellers that come from a wide range of backgrounds. It is only then can a company or brand’s story be told with the lens that is reflective of the world today: multicultural, feminist, and on the edge of a tide turning.

Companies need diversity in thought and approaches, and when it comes to storytelling, it is imperative that companies carefully select storytellers who can intuitively tap into the heartbeat of the world we live in.

Stories are powerful, and those who tell it bear the responsibility to express it with integrity, sensitivity, a deep humanity. More than ever, we need leaders and storytellers who can envision how to uplift people from the bottom up, not the top-down.

We need leaders and storytellers who can pulse with the heart of community organizers, and yet still wrap their minds around business priorities.

We need human-centered leaders and storytellers who can balance people and profit, and most of all, we need them to look like us: multicultural, feminist, and on the edge of a tide turning.

 Let’s get to work.

 

If you’re a media outlet or brand ready to tell powerful and inclusive stories, I would love to help. See my latest web series on NBC News, created with filmmaker Erica Eng, entitled “Wear I’m From”, on the subject of style and cultural identity.

The Time Has Come to Wear Our WHY

  Image via Harper's Bazaar

Image via Harper's Bazaar

Something wildly exciting is happening in the world right now, and last night, it took center stage at the Golden Globes, standing defiantly on the red carpet. The sea of black dresses arrived to show the world that there is nothing more powerful than an idea whose time has come. But is it here to stay?

The #TimesUp movement painted the Golden Globes in multiple shades of black as a symbol of solidarity for gender equality and victims of sexual harrasment. For this red carpet event, the question wasn’t solely about who or what you’re wearing, but WHY you’re wearing it.

Fashion has long been a symbol of self-expression and identity. But in this moment in history, fashion, more than ever, is lending us an opportunity to wear our values- not just for celebrities on award shows, but as everyday people dressing ourselves in our daily lives. Wearing our values means that we are making fashion choices that reflect our desire for social change.

  Actors & Activists at the Golden Globes, giving spotlight to what matters

Actors & Activists at the Golden Globes, giving spotlight to what matters

That being said, have you ever asked yourself, “Who made my clothes”?

The #TimesUp movement speaks for women who have been marginalized across all industries. As a conscious fashion champion, I am particularly excited that the #TimesUp statement includes a nod to garment workers, the hidden figures behind the clothes we wear.

Red carpet glamour or not, we all wear and buy clothes, which means that we participate in the fashion industry. I encourage you to think about the fact that 80 percent of the people making our clothes are women of color ages 18-24, many of whom fight for equal pay, safe working conditions, and freedom from sexual violence everyday. The women who make our clothes are fighting the same fight we are.

The shades of black at the #GoldenGlobes proves that the tide is indeed, turning. And as we commend the brave women in Hollywood who are shining a spotlight on the issue, let’s all do our part to make sure that this movement is far more than a moment. We need a movement that lasts long after the cameras are off and the parties are over.

The time is up for apathy. There is much work to do and many ways to do it, but I invite you to use your fashion as a force for good. Let your fashion choices speak as loud as you can, and join me in wearing our thundering WHYs from head to toe.

It’s our time,

Ruby

Want to wear your WHY? Check out the resources below to find out more:

My Conscious Fashion Brand Directory

My Blog Posts, "Ethical Fashion Is a Women's Empowerment Issue" ,  "What to Keep In Mind When Shopping"

Check out Remake's "How to Be An Activist in Your Everyday Life"

 

My 'Glamour for Good' Gift Guide

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Don't know what to get for your soul mate-sister-friend? Look no further, because I've put together some exquisite picks (in all price ranges) here on my personal 'Glamour for Good' gift guide. Not only do these items make for elegant gifts, but they also feed the heart/mind/soul, while giving back. Gift giving will never be the same again. ;)

1. Aja Monet's Book, "My Mother Was A Freedom Fighter", $10.87 on AmazonAja's writing reminds us how words can heal, set free, break open, and then put our broken pieces back together to make us even more whole. If you didn't think words had the power to light a revolution (personal and otherwise), Aja will make you a believer. 

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2. Eugenia Shea Butter, from $12.50 | Eu’Genia Shea is a family-run, black-owned social enterprise dedicated to all natural premium shea butter moisturizers. The mother-daughter duo are dedicated to fair wages and opportunities for their female workers in Ghana and donate 15% of our profits back to them in the form of an education fund. Their shea butters come in delicious scents ranging from lavender to grapefruit. Yummy. 

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3. Ceramic Tea Cup & Saucer from GlobeIn, $12.50GlobeIn is a social enterprise that works with artisans all around the world at fair trade, so you can be confident that anything you get from their site will support communities directly. I'm crushing on this cute ceramic tea cup & saucer pair, made in India's "ceramic city", Khurja. Perfect for a lazy Sunday cozied in with your journal/book. 

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4. Rose Gold Blossom Passion Planner, $20-30 | Founded by a young Filipina, the Passion Planner is the perfect gift for your ambitious friend with big, beautiful dreams. With useful layouts and calendars, your glow-getter can easily outline her world takeover and shine bright in 2018.

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5. Dior by Avedon Coffee Table Book, available on Amazon from $50 (used). | A legendary couturier in collaboration with one of the greatest fashion photographers of all time? It's nothing short of a dream. Christian Dior embodies Paris Fashion, and Avedon immortalizes it for generations to come. Experience the era of elegance through these iconic images.  

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6. Onyx Dress in Crimson, By Reformation $148 | Reformation is a fashion brand based in Los Angeles known for making stylish clothes that are good for the planet. They also employ their makers with fair wages and health insurance, so their business is the sexiest social enterprise around. Not to mention, their clothes are runway ready and can enchant every fashionista. This Onyx Dress in Crimson looks like the perfect NYE outfit, doesn't it? 

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7. The Crossbody Cluth from Vele, $295 | Vele is a brand dedicated to making conscious essentials and nurturing empowered communities. With a core commitment to women's empowerment, Vele's founders are intentional about making every woman- from the production to the consumer end- feel valued and worthy. That's why they make their products in collaboration with artisans in Spain, where they provide fair wages and ethical manufacturing. They also donate 10% of their sales to a non-profit called Not For Sale, which combats human trafficking.  Their cross body clutch is a functional piece that can transform from day to night with ease. It's minimal aesthetic also makes it a timeless, classic piece. 

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Still want more ideas? Check out other gift guides I've written: 

Hella Pinay Gift Guide (2017)

NBC Asian America Gift Guide (2016)

NBC Asian America Gift Guide (2015)

I didn't write this one, but love the picks from Remake as well. 

Here's to a Christmas of Glamour & Good, 

Ruby 

 

 

Ethical Fashion Is A Women's Empowerment Issue

 T-Shirt via Christian Dior. Was it truly feminist? 

T-Shirt via Christian Dior. Was it truly feminist? 

The power of fashion is that clothes can have the ability to empower us from the inside out.

Whether we are we are wearing a power suit to a job interview or a statement t-shirt in our every day lives, the clothes we wear is our message to the world. Sometimes, a brand new dress can do the trick of outfitting a renewed sense of confidence. We’ve all had that one item that we slipped on, and suddenly, it felt (and looked) like pure magic. With it, we were more ready to take on the world.

But have you ever stopped to think where these clothes come from, and how they were made?

On the other side of the world, another woman, not much different from you and I, made the clothes we wear. She has similar wants and dreams: to live a good life, to have adventure, to provide for her family, and most importantly, she demands to be safe at work, to be free from any forms of harassment, and to have equal pay.

 “I was 19 when I left my home village in Yulian and headed to the city to find work at a factory. That’s what many girls from my village do. I was so curious and excited to explore the world outside. Three years later my entire life is the factory, full of long hard hours on my feet." -Ming Hui, a factory worker from China  Image and caption  via Remake

“I was 19 when I left my home village in Yulian and headed to the city to find work at a factory. That’s what many girls from my village do. I was so curious and excited to explore the world outside. Three years later my entire life is the factory, full of long hard hours on my feet." -Ming Hui, a factory worker from China

Image and caption via Remake

But to make the clothes that we wear to empower ourselves, her voice is in turn, suppressed and disempowered in the process. Every day, she worries whether she will get paid fairly, if she will be sexually or physically harassed by her boss, or if she will remain safe in her working conditions.

Over 60 million people are employed by the garment industry, and over 80% of them are millennial women of color ages 18-24.

Coincidentally, this is the same demographic of women that I’ve worked with in the United States, the same women I’ve been committed to empowering through writing and self-empowerment workshops. And just like the women that I’ve worked with, the women working at garment factories are just as bold and strong, and they deserve to be recognized. 

Understanding that ethical fashion is a women's empowerment issue is what led me to the movement, and my aspiration is to connect the dots between both causes

Today, being a feminist is 'on trend', and while it is positive that this is becoming a mainstream idea, we also have to question the authenticity of it when it hits places like the fashion runway. With so many "women's empowerment" slogans and themes available across so many brands, it is imperative that we ask them if any women were disempowered in the process of making these clothes. 

If we truly want to be feminist and to advocate for every woman's right to be safe, to have equal pay, and to live her best life, then it's time we champion that for women across the world- from all sides of the supply chain. It's time to mean what we say, and to wear what we mean. 

*****

Want to know how to get involved? Here's a few ways how: 

1. An article came out recently about Zara not paying their workers. Tweet to Zara and tell them: @Zara this is unacceptable. Pay your workers what they deserve. Additionally, tweet your favorite brands and ask them #whomademyclothes ? (Via Fashion Revolution)

2. Educate yourself on the connections between women's empowerment and responsible fashion. Here's a past article I've written that could shed more insight.  

See more stories via Remake here. 

3. Vote with your dollar: make some adjustments in your shopping habits to become more responsible. You can find ideas here, here, and here. If you're interested in buying ethical brands, check out my Ethical Brand Directory here. 

Lastly, stay tuned for more blog posts here to give you more ideas! 

 

Spotted at Paris Fashion Week: Social A-WEAR-ness

 This past Paris Fashion Week season, I covered the  other  fashion show: the ones happening outside! Instead of only interviewing designers, I also interviewed attendees for Remake's "Humans of Fashion" segment. See below my recap of the experience, and what it was like to talk about ethical fashion on the largest fashion stage in the world. 

This past Paris Fashion Week season, I covered the other fashion show: the ones happening outside! Instead of only interviewing designers, I also interviewed attendees for Remake's "Humans of Fashion" segment. See below my recap of the experience, and what it was like to talk about ethical fashion on the largest fashion stage in the world. 

This piece originally appeared on REMAKE

This season was my first time serving as a Remake Humans of Fashion correspondent during Paris Fashion Week. As a conscious fashion advocate, I am passionate about my advocacy, but truthfully, I was nervous about discussing it with the fashion community at PFW because I knew that it could potentially be an uncomfortable topic. I braced myself for the possibility of encountering resistance or lack of interest, and prepared by making sure that I asked the right questions that would break the ice gracefully.

   Not many people are aware about it, but fashion is the second most polluting industry in the planet. Fashion changes very quickly, so people don’t think twice about throwing away their clothes and changing their wardrobes every season. I hope that people can think about how their personal styles can have an impact on the environment and on people. I want to push people to be more aware, and make more ethical choices. Of course everyone is pushed into having the new ‘hot’ item or whatever, but it’s like, who had to had to suffer so I can have a cool blouse for 3 months? I think that it is possible to have style and consciousness, and I hope to bridge that gap. - Raye, Stylist

Not many people are aware about it, but fashion is the second most polluting industry in the planet. Fashion changes very quickly, so people don’t think twice about throwing away their clothes and changing their wardrobes every season. I hope that people can think about how their personal styles can have an impact on the environment and on people. I want to push people to be more aware, and make more ethical choices. Of course everyone is pushed into having the new ‘hot’ item or whatever, but it’s like, who had to had to suffer so I can have a cool blouse for 3 months? I think that it is possible to have style and consciousness, and I hope to bridge that gap. - Raye, Stylist

When I arrived on the scene, I saw everything I would expect to see each season: a myriad of outfits ranging from head-to-toe luxury designer wear to those who had daring personal style. Because PFW is regarded as the most prestigious among all the fashion weeks, it attracts a fascinating international crowd ranging from industry icons to newly minted students, and everyone has their own distinctive look. During that week, the global fashion community collides, and the photographers are all waiting to capture the best looks. The already stylish (but usually monochrome) Paris gets a jolt of electricity from its colorful and fabulous guests, and they are just as fun to watch (if not more) than the actual shows on the runways!

As I scope the scene, I pick out someone whose look catches my eye. After complimenting my chosen subject on their outfit (almost everyone at PFW was dressed to the nines after all), I proceeded by asking the basic questions: their name, and whether they worked in the industry. I then asked what they liked about fashion, and what they didn’t like. I found that these questions helped to warm up the conversation, and helped to serve as a launch pad towards more meatier conversations around ethics, sustainability, and overall thoughts about what the fashion world was doing right, as well as what they can and should improve.

   I think the image fashion has can be off-putting to some people. You will meet people who are challenging and mean and will give you their worst instead of giving you their best. But I do think its part of its charm. I do hope that people in the fashion industry can become more conscious- to be more green, and to be more helpful to people. I think we can all be better.   - Damien, Communications Brand Manager Assistant

I think the image fashion has can be off-putting to some people. You will meet people who are challenging and mean and will give you their worst instead of giving you their best. But I do think its part of its charm. I do hope that people in the fashion industry can become more conscious- to be more green, and to be more helpful to people. I think we can all be better. - Damien, Communications Brand Manager Assistant

To my surprise, more than half of the attendees that I spoke to had some familiarity with conscious fashion, and a good number of them were already deeply involved in our movement as designers.

As they say, social good is ‘hot’ on the runways right now, and even though this can be superficial, I personally find it positive that an “a-wear-ness” has sparked, hopefully leading to active participation and real change.

   I’m from Jordan. My collection is inspired by hometown. In terms of production, I work with refugees and local women. When we say ‘refugees’ we always associate it with camps and so forth, but I work with three people very intimately: a Syrian man, a woman from Iraq, and a local woman from Jordan for the embroidery. I try to utilize as much as I can from the Arab world because I feel its time for us to shine, and we have so much potential. It’s a reaction to say that it’s not just what you see on the news. There is so much potential, and it makes me so proud. I’ve always wanted to do my own fashion line but my brain didn’t want me to do something conventional. Yeah I design, and I have funky prints, but it had to have a message. - Tania George, Designer

I’m from Jordan. My collection is inspired by hometown. In terms of production, I work with refugees and local women. When we say ‘refugees’ we always associate it with camps and so forth, but I work with three people very intimately: a Syrian man, a woman from Iraq, and a local woman from Jordan for the embroidery. I try to utilize as much as I can from the Arab world because I feel its time for us to shine, and we have so much potential. It’s a reaction to say that it’s not just what you see on the news. There is so much potential, and it makes me so proud. I’ve always wanted to do my own fashion line but my brain didn’t want me to do something conventional. Yeah I design, and I have funky prints, but it had to have a message. - Tania George, Designer

Meanwhile, 40% of the people I talked to were completely unaware about the myriad of social justice and environmental issues surrounding fashion. What was interesting was this group was also not at all interested in delving more. For those I interviewed who didn’t have any knowledge in ethical fashion, what we had in common was a love for the fashion universe. Many of them commented at how much they appreciate the creativity within fashion, and it’s ability to give us a language of personal expression through the clothes we wear. However, they didn’t seem very interested to learn how they might be able to wear their values.

Still, I was encouraged that about 60% of the interviewees I engaged with were somewhat aware of conscious fashion.

I was heartened that these conversations were meaningful. We bonded over a shared advocacy and joy that we found each other at PFW–it was like finding a special tribe among the fashion crowd!

   A few years back, I thought design management would be a great next step because I wanted to build my empire. Little did I know that my priorities will completely shift, because the program [I took] revolved around the UN Development goals. [I realized] it is our duty as designers to make things ‘cradle to cradle’, so this was the mindset. Everything around us has a designer behind it. It is the designer’s job to make sure the materials are sourced properly. They have to consider where they will end, what is the life cycle. It is our duty- we have to push it, then people will start normalizing it. -  Sadeem , Fashion Designer

A few years back, I thought design management would be a great next step because I wanted to build my empire. Little did I know that my priorities will completely shift, because the program [I took] revolved around the UN Development goals. [I realized] it is our duty as designers to make things ‘cradle to cradle’, so this was the mindset. Everything around us has a designer behind it. It is the designer’s job to make sure the materials are sourced properly. They have to consider where they will end, what is the life cycle. It is our duty- we have to push it, then people will start normalizing it. - Sadeem, Fashion Designer

One such conversation was with designer Sadeem Alshehail from Saudi Arabia, who I met at the “Fashion Forward Dubai” showroom, which aimed to launch Middle Eastern designers in the international market. Sadeem shared her journey towards creating an ethical luxury brand, which was inspired by her schooling at Pratt Institute. She explained that she was once a buyer, and originally wanted to pursue a new degree to ‘grow her empire’, but because her curriculum at Pratt revolved around the UN Development goals, she unexpectedly shifted her priorities to ensure that she wasn’t only going to design beautiful clothes, but impactful solutions too. I was happy to see that her collection of tailored, elegant, nautical inspired dresses was displayed among other decadently designed dresses. It wasn’t categorized as the lone ‘ethical brand’, but rather, just another brand that belongs with the luxury line-up. She added, “Most people think about luxury and then ethical as tie-dye or hemp dresses. But I really want to make luxury ethical.”

I had not expected to find so many like-minded slow fashion movement makers at PFW, from designers to stylists who were already working towards a more equitable, sustainable industry. It made me feel hopeful for fashion’s future, and even though there is a long, long way to go, I know that the changemakers are out there, putting in the work to make sure that social good becomes a timeless classic, on and off the runway.

Want more? Get more. Humans of Fashion this way.

Presenting "WEAR I'M FROM", My Original Web Series About Style & Cultural Identity for NBC News

   Click each image to view the episode!    Ep. 1 feat. Monica Phromsavanh: A History Remembered Through Unexploded Bombs

Click each image to view the episode!

Ep. 1 feat. Monica Phromsavanh: A History Remembered Through Unexploded Bombs

Growing up, I craved the ability to see a reflection of strong, positive, and uplifting Asian-American voices in the media, and beyond. For APIAs, representation is something we continue to fight for. This has been the driving force behind the work I do today: as a writer, fashion correspondent, and speaker, my strength lies in the power of voice & story.

 Ep. 2 feat. Victor Zapanta: This T-Shirt Is Part of Victor Diaz Zapanta's Family Narrative

Ep. 2 feat. Victor Zapanta: This T-Shirt Is Part of Victor Diaz Zapanta's Family Narrative

Knowing this, I am impassioned to share stories that make women of color feel proud of where they come from, and I am committed to creating spaces that intersect style with substance, all the while promoting inclusion, empowerment, & social good. 

 Ep. 3 feat. Natalie Le: Connecting With a Father’s Refugee Story Through a Necklace

Ep. 3 feat. Natalie Le: Connecting With a Father’s Refugee Story Through a Necklace

I am honored to be able to exercise these missions through my project with NBC Asian America, in which I have been given the opportunity to be the Creator & Producer of “WEAR I’M FROM”, an original web series about STYLE & CULTURAL IDENTITY.

 Ep. 4 feat. Jasmine Wahi: Hand Embroidered Shawl Celebrates Family Legacy

Ep. 4 feat. Jasmine Wahi: Hand Embroidered Shawl Celebrates Family Legacy

Thank you to Traci Lee and NBC Asian America for believing in my vision for this project, and making it a reality. A big thank you to my project partner, Director Erica Eng, who shared her illustrious talents to bring this to life. Additional credits to: Blaine Dunkley (Director of Photography), Nathan Bonetto (audio), Anna Romano (editor) and both Dahlak Brathwaite and Authentik Beats for providing background music.
 
I hope you enjoy. If you feel inspired, please do re-share! And do participate by sharing YOUR style & cultural identity stories via social media. Take a photo of you and your clothing item, caption it with the story as to how it connects you to your heritage, and use the hashtag #WEARIMFROM. 

Screen Shot 2017-10-06 at 9.16.20 PM.png

Thank you, thank you. 

Yours,
Ruby

Self-Reflections: When In Doubt, Look IN, Not Out

  Photo by The Green Balloon

Photo by The Green Balloon

On my bad days, I have a tendency to look for it everywhere. Everywhere except for the most obvious place.

I rummage through every word exchanged, try to lift up the curtains of each adjective to see if I can catch a glimpse of it. I dig in the folds of each smile, comb through every gesture, or wait until it finally shows up.

And too often I forget that the best way to find it is by looking in, not out.

What I have come to realize is that validation is most potent when it is founded from our inner source, not when it comes from the outside. Outside validation feels good and I definitely don’t deny that we all need it once in a while, but if you don’t have a strong inner foundation of self-worth, then outside validation will be nothing but a momentary, fleeting wind.

So how do we anchor ourselves down to enjoy a solid sense of self-worth? By being in constant awareness of our strengths and remembering the value we can offer in any situation. What makes you unique, special, and talented? What do you bring to the table? Make a list. When you can name all of your positive traits, you tend to remember them better. Besides, how can anyone else recognize them if we don’t see it in ourselves first?

Too often, we forget to stand in a position of power because we fail to recognize and express how truly valuable we are. We act like passive receivers, waiting for opportunity, when the truth is that we are active contributors to every situation.

And you know what? The thing that you want actually needs you just as much as you need it. Whether it’s a personal or professional “want”, every single prospect should be approached by your own questioning of whether or not it is a good fit for you, not just the other way around. You are the boss of your own life, and you are interviewing every prospective job and investigating every potential relationship to see if it brings enough value to your own path of growth.

So don’t forget to look inside. You can stop all the external rummaging and the turning of every stone. Simply look in, open the window, and let the light shine in on your inner power.

The treasure is already within you.

Exercise: Make a list (at least 10 items) of all your strengths. Remind yourself what makes you valuable, and show up from that space. When you stand from a position of power and self-appreciation, everything changes. 

I'd love to get your feedback! I'm thinking about putting a collection of essays like this into a book. Would a book of these self-reflections be helpful for you and your journey? Do let me know by emailing me at ruby@rubyveridiano.com and or reaching out to me via social at @rubyveridiano :) 

Read My Interview with the C&A Foundation on the United Nations Foundation's Site

I recently had the opportunity to chat with the Head of Gender Justice and Human Rights at the C&A Foundation, and the interview was posted on the United Nations Foundation's site, The Global Daily. See the preview below, and click the link the read on: 


What the Fashion & Apparel Industry Can Do to Truly Be Feminist

How the apparel industry can take action to empower women

By: Ruby Veridiano

It’s no secret that the fashion industry impacts thousands of women around the world. But while mainstream media is often focused on the women who buy the clothes, it is the women who make our garments, fashion’s hidden figures, who are drastically affected by the decisions businesses and consumers make. With the rise of ‘feminist fashion’, it leaves one to wonder what the industry is actually doing to support women across the supply chain.

The C&A Foundation, in partnership with the International Center for Research on Women (ICRW) recently released a new report, entitled “Empowering Female Workers in the Apparel Industry”. The report primarily covers the three main actions businesses can take immediately in order to shift the industry towards gender equality. The research also received support from the Levi Strauss Foundation, and was prepared by Business of Social Responsibility (BSR).

[Ruby Veridiano, contributor here at the Global Daily], got a chance to interview Brandee Butler, Head of Gender Justice and Human Rights at the C&A Foundation, to learn more about the main takeaways of the study, and to get a fuller understanding as to how the fashion industry can truly empower and uplift women.

Read more here. 

I’m a Conscious Fashion Advocate. But I’ll Never Shame You for Wearing Zara, and Here’s Why

The practice of building an ethical wardrobe is not an easy one. For one, ethical brands are much more expensive than ‘normal’ brands, so much so that ethical fashion has been accused of being ‘elitist’ in numerous occasions. Ethical brands rightfully cost more because the price tag covers a fair wage for artisans, safe working conditions, and a healthy margin for the ethical business to be sustainable.

It is a noble cause, and as much as we all wish we could consume more ethically, it simply is not accessible to everyone. Admittedly, even I can’t manage to buy ethical items all the time. Frankly, it’s not realistic or fair to expect that everyone can have the purchasing power to support only ethical brands, because the reality of the world is that we come from varied economic backgrounds. And yet, no matter how much money we own, we all share the basic necessity of needing clothing, and I don't think it's too much to ask for us to feel good and decent in them. 

During a recent conversation with my friend and fashion academic Tanisha C. Ford, she made an excellent point: a 14-year-old girl living in an inner city neighborhood still looks at Zara as an aspirational, luxury brand. It wouldn’t make much sense for us to fault that 14-year-old girl for aspiring for something that society has taught her to want: a beautiful dress that has the potential to outfit her confidence. That 14-year old girl from the inner city does not have the means to buy ethical, even if she wanted to. So as much as I advocate for the moral value behind conscious fashion, it is also not morally correct to shame someone for buying Zara if that’s what their purchasing power allows them to afford.

As essayist, journalist, and activist S.E. Smith so eloquently writes, “Moralistic scolding of people who buy ‘cheap junk made in [fill in your country]’ doesn’t actually address the problem that this is a market that’s created the consumer, not a consumer that’s created the market — wages in the US remain stagnant despite advocacy on the issue, cost of living is rising, and many people can’t make the choices they would prefer to make, because they’re facing down very limited options. This is deliberate, as companies have substantial margins of profit on inexpensively-produced goods made in nations with lax labor laws and poor environmental standards”.

While I believe that consumers can vote with their dollar, not everyone can afford to make this a priority. In my books, that is absolutely okay. I do however, want to suggest different ways in which we can create more responsible shopping habits, which doesn’t involve only buying ethical products:

1.     Buy Less, and Choose Well: Fast Fashion has created a market where clothes can be bought by the dozen. As a result, we are tempted to ‘get our money’s worth’ by buying a lot of cheap items. Instead, I encourage you to choose QUALITY over quantity- instead of spending $100 on five cheap items, use that same $100 to buy one, beautifully made, long-lasting item that you will actually treasure for a longer period of time. This is certainly a more sustainable practice.

2.     30 Wear Rule: In general, I go by this- before buying an item, ask yourself if you can actually commit to wearing it at least 30 times. This helps us choose items that aren’t disposable, but ones that can actually last.

3.     Buy vintage when possible: When possible, give clothes that have already been made another life. In essence, buying vintage is recycling. And if you live in Paris like me, you can find fantastic, “Made in France” items that are made in top quality standards! 

For more ideas, see this ethical fashion shopping guide, made by Anuschka Rees

If you absolutely have to buy from Zara, trust that I will never make you feel bad about it. Rather, I will encourage you to consider points #1 and #2 above. While we can’t always buy ethical, we can manage to practice socially responsible shopping habits, no matter the budget.

Ethical Brand Spotlight: Yours Again

Yours Again is a Copenhagen-based fashion brand that upcycles denim to create refreshing "new" pieces. Transforming old denim fabrics and reworking them into unique designs, Yours Again embraces the beauty and imperfection of used denim, and alchemizes them into chic fashion pieces that are sexy and sustainable. Check out my interview with the woman behind the brand, Simona Uvarovaite, and learn how she has created a fashion brand aligned with her cause and her values. 

1.    What is your background, and how did you get into the business of fashion? 

I always knew I wanted to be a designer, I just wasn’t sure what kind. I started off with studying interior design in Lithuania, but became disappointed with the study program. So I decided to move to Denmark and study sustainable fashion. To be honest, I was not that much into fashion at that point, but when I learned about how polluting and unsustainable the industry is, I got really inspired to change that and find new sustainable practices to improve it. After graduating, I did quite few internships which led me to realize that I need to be the change I want to see- so I decided to start my own brand. It was scary at first to start working independently at such a young age, but it was the only thing that made sense to me. I didn’t want to work for someone I couldn’t relate to.

2.    Where are you and your brand based? 

I am based in Copenhagen, Denmark, but most of our suppliers, as well as the production workshop, are based in Lithuania.

3.    What inspired you to create your brand, Yours Again? Why denim? 

Before starting Yours Again, I thought a lot about what sustainability means to me and how I want to work with it in my career. I thought a lot about production processes and materials other sustainable brands use, and it just seemed to me that in the end, it does not solve the main problem – consumption. Organic cotton is great, but it still uses resources just as any other eco-friendly fabric. So for me, it made sense to use something we already have; clothing that people have already thrown away, and bring it back to life again. Denim seemed to be the perfect choice for many reasons: first, it is more predictable than most other textiles in terms of texture, composition and colors, therefore it is easier to source. Second, it is a very durable fabric, and it only looks better with time. And most importantly, it is a very polluting textile and it takes great amounts of water to make one pair of jeans. So I felt like denim should not go to waste as it can easily be reused and brought to life again. 

4. Why is it important to you to participate in sustainable and ethical practices? 

It is the future of fashion. Communication has become so much easier, and people have access to so much information, which empowers us to be more transparent and have more control over supply chains. The excuse ‘We didn’t know our garments were produced in Bangladesh’ is not good enough anymore. People ask questions and support the brands they believe in. There are quite few brands that inspired me to change my buying habits and even start my own brand. Yours Again has strong values in sustainability and ethical production and hopefully, that can inspire more brands to do upcycling, or find new ways to use already produced resources.

5. What is the power of upcycling? How does it promote a more conscious lifestyle? 

The power of upcycling is using something that has already been created, lived its life, and repurpose it into something new and better. Turning old and unwanted into new and desired.

Upcycling is also about inspiring people to love their clothes and show different ways to reuse them once they have worn out.

6.    You made different pieces out of denim, from bracelets to vests. What is the most creative use for upcyled denim you've developed so far? What is your favorite piece out of your collections? 

Currently we are working on a new collaboration, where we use denim for home décor products. It is still in early stages, but some of the products, for instance denim stuffed cushion, I instantly fell in love with. These products are designed to use almost all of our leftovers and hopefully we can get as close to zero waste as we can. 

And talking about current collections that are already on our webshop, I would say Reckless vest is one of my favorites.

7.    What message do you hope to spread through your work? 

I want to inspire people to love their clothing, take care of it and choose wisely what they buy. I want to show that fashion can be exclusive, beautiful and harmless at the same time.
  The Founder, Simona

The Founder, Simona

8.  What changes do you hope fashion (the industry and/or their consumers) can make to be more conscious of the people and the planet? 

I really hope to see more quality in the future, both from the fashion industry and the consumer. If consumers choose to buy higher quality clothing, made with care and thought, then sooner or later, the industry will get the demand. Before mass production took over, people loved having their clothes custom-made for them, so they could feel unique and wear the piece for many years. I hope this trend will come back one day and consumers will start buying more from smaller brands with strong values.

 

 


The Power of Starting with WHY

  My WHY: Empowering women to find their voice

My WHY: Empowering women to find their voice

Everyone asks us what we want to be when we grow up, but when it comes to our life’s work, I think there’s another question that is far more important. Instead of asking ourselves what we want to be, I think we should start asking, “What problems do we want to solve?”
 
Thought leader Simon Sinek once said, “It’s not important WHAT you do, it’s important WHY you do it.” So what is your “WHY”? What is the reason behind your work?
 
We are living in a time where the news suggests that the world is in a constant state of havoc. Based on my Facebook news feed alone, the world can certainly feel like a lot. Needless to say, if we’re not careful about where we look, it can look pretty dark out there.
 
So what can we do, and where do we begin? For starters, I believe we have to hold the mirror onto ourselves and reflect: what we are doing to contribute to the solution? Are we being loving and kind in our daily actions? Are we extending generosity and positivity to those we encounter on our day to day? Are we loving ourselves enough to have the strength to give love to others? Are we becoming the women and men the world needs us to become? Most importantly, are we being brave enough to take a stand for something?
 
It’s more important than ever to live with a purpose and a cause, but I also know that for many, it can be a struggle to find theirs. But if you begin by wondering which problems you are drawn to solve, or what you are being called to create, you might get a little closer to the answer. How many of us can honestly say that we have explored our curiosities by stepping out and actually getting involved in them, however small the step may be?
 
When I was a college freshman, I discovered the art of spoken word through my friend Adriel. From the beginning, I told Adriel that I was a writer, but definitely not a performer. But after much cajoling, Adriel eventually convinced me to read my first poem at an open mic. After all, I was curious, so I decided that it couldn’t hurt to try.
 
When the open mic night came, I approached the stage filled with both nervousness and excitement. I was shy at first, but then it came: a roaring fire that I never knew existed within me. It was as if I had discovered my superpowers for the first time.
 
That small step I took led to an unexpected six-year career as a professional spoken word artist, taking me to perform at hundreds of venues across the globe, and facilitating writing workshops that combined art with social change. It also led me to discovering my passion for using my voice to empower women and to encourage others to change the world along with me. It helped me to do the important work of building bridges among communities, and helping others find their voice so that they too, can speak for the causes they believed in.
 
Had I not taken that small step to explore my curiosity, I would not have discovered my personal purpose. And I would not have found my WHY.
 
Because the more we step out to be an active participant in shaping the world, the more the world responds to us. We can’t soul search just by thinking about it, we have to engage every part of us by taking action and testing it out. Doing. Immersing both the mind and the body in leaning into the curves of life’s question marks is how we find the exclamation points, the Eureka moments that punctuate our purpose.
 
I encourage you to dig deep and cultivate your WHY. Because when we as a collective begin to lead with that, we begin to fill all the dark holes with our light. All it takes is one small spark to illuminate the world.
 
Are you willing to light the match?
 
If your answer is yes, let's light up the world together. 

I invite you to join me for my "Women On A Mission" workshop in San Francisco on May 13th, where I will help you define your mission statement and clarify your WHY. 
Get your early bird tickets here! 

I Got A Chance to Ask Prabal Gurung 10 Questions...

I have been a fan of Prabal Gurung since he launched his first collection, so it was very special to have been able to ask him ten of my most pressing questions for an article I worked on for NBC News. As a fashion changemaker, I am most impressed by his roots in activism, and his vision for change. Here's a peek:

Your last show was very political. Many designers shy away from being involved politics, but you're going at it head on. What drives you to use your platform as intentionally as you do?

It's a crucial time for our country, for the world really. As a designer with a platform, I feel a responsibility to use my voice and to lead the conversation in a way that can provoke change.

I've been told by some to keep quiet — that fashion and politics do not mix and that I should stick to my trade, however I cannot disagree more. I feel compelled to take a stand and challenge notions of what fashions' role can be in our society.

To read the rest of the Q&A, head on over to NBC News

Ethical Brand Spotlight: milo + nicki

  From milo + nicki

From milo + nicki

Founded by Nicki Patel and inspired by her journey along with her pup, Milo, milo + nicki is an ethical fashion brand with Indian and Zambian roots. milo + nicki's  handwoven creations are made with natural fiber, and the designer ensures that she keeps sustainability at the forefront of her brand. Read on below to learn more about milo + nicki, the founder's story, and what's behind her heart-centered brand. 

What inspired you to create your brand? What's the story behind it? 

My name is Nicki and my partner in crime is the handsome, crazy energetic stud Milo (my pup). We are an energetic, indomitable duo that love hard and care deeply about people and the planet. Milo and I both hit rock bottom in 2014. The combination of our health problems, Milo having a major injury, and a very stressful burglary that spiraled us both downward, we begin to slowly feel the floor crumble beneath us. And no doctor or specialist had a remedy.

I lived in fear of not knowing what the next day, hour, or minute held for us.

By combining our health rollercoaster with my love for fashion, my mission to empower women, and my drive to bring awareness to a deep-rooted destructive consumer industry, I came to create milo+nicki.

As we conquer our fears, take a leap of faith, never give up on ourselves, and live a life full of color, I hope to empower you to do the same.

  From milo + nicki

From milo + nicki

Why is it important for you to participate in ethical and sustainable practices? 

The fashion industry is the second largest pollutant in the world, just behind the oil and gas industry. It is saturated by corruption and pollution with stories that never hit the newsstands. What we wear is something more than a piece of cloth. It has history, meaning, roots, sweat, and tears. The sacrifices in each piece of cloth is an untold story, but with milo+nicki, I hope to bring these hidden truths to the surface and build an awareness that drives the ethical and sustainable fashion movement.

Our goal is to educate, empower, and inspire change. We as consumers hold the power for change, we just have to decide with our dollar what we value.

What is the power of your ethical approach to fashion? How does it create a more conscious lifestyle? 

As we began our journey a little over a year ago, I searched high and low to find the perfect fabric supplier, to locate the most ethical local factory, and to create the least environmental impactful supply chain. I realized this was tough, very tough, but I knew that this was something that was very important to us due to our love for the planet and the people. Our power is creating a clear and open formula for transparency coupled with the story of our brand.

If we are open with our consumers, they will want to learn more about our story and brand, which will make them feel more empowered to share our story and support our brand, but also educate and empower the cycle to continue through to other aspects of their lifestyle.

  From milo + nicki

From milo + nicki

What message do you hope to spread through your work?

With milo+nicki, I want to empower the ever-evolving women, wherever they are in the world, to push the limits within themselves and within society to conquer her fears, take a leap of faith, never give up on herself and live a life of color. Because no dream is too big, no passion is too small, and no routine is unbreakable.

What changes do you hope fashion can make to be more conscious of the people and the planet? 

For the consumers: ask questions and use the power of your dollar to cast a vote for what you believe in. Knowing how something is made, where it is made, who it is made by, and why we made it that way is not only crucial for shifting the industry norms and practices, and holding brands accountable, but it allows the consumer to feel empowered, inspired and educated on what they are putting next to the largest organ on their body.

For the industry and brands: share the story of the entire process of creating the pieces, be transparent in your supply chain, and be responsible to the people and planet on what and how you create.

To support milo + nicki's first collection, check out their kickstarter campaign here. 

 

From NYC to Paris: My Fashion Week Coverage for the Fall 2017 RTW Season

  Waving hello from the DROMe Runway Show, Paris, March 2017

Waving hello from the DROMe Runway Show, Paris, March 2017

Led by my commitment to empowering women and merging fashion with social change, my fashion week coverage views the runway from this lens. With many more designers taking a stand and using their voice to express their values and beliefs, this fashion month was a playground for a changemaker like me. From NYC to Paris, here are all the stories that prove that fashion is more than a superficial concept, but rather, a reflection of the society, culture, and politics that live in. 

Click the article image to read on! 

Until next season! xo Ruby

 

All the Times Socially Conscious Fashion Showed Up on the Oscars Red Carpet

Just a few years ago, my vision to merge fashion with social change felt like a faraway aspiration, one that I did my best to manifest through the creation of the Glamourbaby Diaries. Now, the mergence of fashion and activism are at center stage, at the forefront of all the red carpets, and stunning the paparazzi. More and more, the world’s biggest celebrities are using fashion to express their politics, and it seems, the dream to make social change ‘sexy’ has finally found its time.

If there is a silver lining in Trumpland, you can most likely find it in Ava Duvernay's dress. 

 Ava Duvernay wears  Ashi Studio  of Lebanon. 

Ava Duvernay wears Ashi Studio of Lebanon. 

It’s incredible to see how fashion's collaboration with social awareness has arrived, especially when you see it shining at the Oscars, the world’s biggest award show. It is almost the same feeling I get when I see my friends as familiar faces on the world’s biggest stages as they achieve the dreams they’ve worked so hard to complete:  a strong sense of awe, pride, and a warm feeling of, “you made it”!

But as social awareness butterflies into the new ‘sexy’, let’s not forget that it takes a lot more than a dress or an accessory to wear a lifelong commitment to making a more just, more inclusive society. Let’s make sure we embody these ideals of justice and inclusion by our participation in the democracy and through our everyday choices to take care and protect one another.

Nevertheless, it was still pretty cool to see all the moments where socio-political statements stood front & center on the Oscars Red Carpet this year. 

Irish- Ethiopian actor Ruth Negga, nominated for Best Actress for the film Loving, sports a light blue ACLU ribbon in solidarity with the civil rights organization, paired with a floor-length red, lace Valentino gown. 

Lin-manuel Miranda of "Hamilton" and his mother also wear the blue aclu ribbon. He got his tux from the same place he got his high school prom suit. 

Best Actress winner Emma Stone sports a small Planned Parenthood pin just under the left strap of her Givenchy Haute Couture Gown. 

Emma Roberts Opts for a Sustainable Fashion Choice by choosing a vintage Armani Prive look as part of the Red Dress, Green Carpet Initiative

Now here's to hoping that these fashion statements are just the beginning. 

 

After the Women's March: Be Deliberate and Afraid of Nothing

   Joining in from Paris, I marched with an international community of women from the Human Rights Square in Trocadero to the Eiffel Tower. 

Joining in from Paris, I marched with an international community of women from the Human Rights Square in Trocadero to the Eiffel Tower. 

Like many of those who joined yesterday’s herstory-making event, I am still buzzing with energy and renewed optimism from the Women’s March. Fired up and more ready than ever, I am reignited.

As the daughter of immigrants, I marched for every immigrant daughter and son, so that they could continue to have the courage to make America GREAT. I marched for their right (and destiny) to pursue their biggest dreams, no matter where they come from or how they grew up. I marched for inclusivity, for equality, for #blacklivesmatter , for LGBTQ rights, for my Muslim and Latinx brothers and sisters, and most of all, I marched for love.

 Throughout the march, I noticed that two things stood out the most: the music that moved us, and the undeniable, palpable power of words. The bold words painted on countless signs served a clear message: we will not be silent. And to quote Audre Lorde, the master wordsmith warrior, “I am deliberate and afraid of nothing”. 

Yesterday reaffirmed for me the roles of artists and creatives in this movement: the importance of creating the heartbeat and the pulse for the resistance to come alive. Words and music crack the armor and pierce us where it matters most: the soul.

Remembering this re-inspired me to claim my role as a writer, and my ability to use my words to move mountains, to conjure miracles, to create my own reality, and to tell a new story. A story where every woman is her own heroine, and every man, his own hero.

Now is the time where we must be unyielding in pursuing our best, most powerful selves, and to be unapologetic in pursuing our biggest dreams.

 This weekend, we marched.

Today we choose what mission each of us will take on to keep the soul of the movement alive. I wear many hats in my work, but above all, I re-commit to my role as a writer & storyteller, with hope that my voice will lend you courage to find your own.

Remember: be deliberate and afraid of nothing.

 It’s our time,

Ruby